A woman in Arizona discovered  a note written by a  prison laborer from China inside a purse she bought at Walmart.
Laura Wallace found  message tucked inside the zipper compartment of the purse she purchased at a Sierra Vista Walmart, written in Chinese.
Wallace had a Chinese-speaking person translate the note to English. The letter read:
“Inmates in the Yingshan Prison in Guangxi, China are working 14 hours daily with no break/rest at noon, continue working overtime until 12 midnight, and whoever doesn’t finish his work will be beaten. Their meals are without oil and salt. The boss pays the inmate 2000 yuan, any additional dishes will be finished by the police. If the inmates are sick and need medicine, the cost will be deducted from the salary. Prison in China is unlike prison in America, horse cow goat pig dog (literally, means inhumane treatment).”
Note found in purse.
Wallace added,” Two other people translated the note to make sure the message was accurate.  Wallace said she wanted to share the note to bring awareness to the situation.
“I don’t want this to be an attack on any store,” Wallace said. “That’s not the answer. This is happening at all kinds of places and people just probably don’t know.”
Walmart issued a statement to KVOA on the incident:
“We can’t comment specifically on this note, because we have no way to verify the origin of the letter, but one of our requirements for suppliers is all work should be voluntary as indicated in our Standards for Suppliers.”
Similar notes reportedly have turned up in items sold at stores including Saks Fifth Avenue and K-Mart.
This article (Woman Finds Note From Chinese Labor Prison Inside Walmart Purse) was originally published at Minds and is reposted here.

Last year, Scotland’s oldest woman revealed her hilarious secret to living a long and healthy life. 109-year-old Jessie Gallan credited her aging to a nice warm bowl of porridge every morning. That, and also staying far away from men.
“They’re just more trouble than they’re worth,” the spitfire explained  to the Daily Mail. Gallan left home at the age of 13 and began milking cows for work. As a result, she learned early in life the importance of working hard to earn a living. “I worked hard and seldom would I ever take a holiday,” she said.
Jessie carried that worth ethic with her throughout her entire life. Never married, the remarkable lady refused to rely on anyone but herself.
“She’s absolutely amazing,” said a caregiver at the nursing home where Gallan resided. Even in her second century of life, Jessie thrived. Furthermore, she frequently attended church and exercise classes.
Get to know Jessie in the interview video below.
A few short months after revealing her secrets to longevity, Gallan sadly passed away in March of 2015 in Aberdeen, Scotland. May she be a reminder us all to live life fully no matter our age. Who needs men, anyway?

I’m sure you’ve heard of ‘mindfulness’ before. From mental health experts to professional athletes, it’s being touted as the next big revolution in psychology.
The truth is that mindfulness has been around for centuries in the Eastern world, it’s just that the Western world is slow to catch on.
But don’t worry, it’s not very complex. The main crux of it involves focusing your attention on the present moment with a non-judgmental and compassionate attitude.
It can be a remarkable technique to help you cope with difficult situations in life.
To practice mindfulness, here are 7 habits. They may seem difficult at first, but if you keep at it, they’ll benefit you for a lifetime.

1. Practice Gratitude

Being grateful for the blessings we receive can be one of the most important habits you can develop, hands down. It reminds us to enjoy what we have, rather than desiring what we don’t.
To practice gratitude, immediately write down 3 things you are grateful for when you wake up. Be as specific as possible—specificity is key to fostering gratitude. All it takes is 15 minutes. The goal of the exercise is to remember a good event, experience, person, or thing in your life—then enjoy the good emotions that come with it.

2. Feel your feet and palms

This is a technique that will anchor yourself to the present moment. Draw your attention to your feet and palms. Notice the pressure of your feet against the floor or bed, the temperature, comfort or discomfort, itches, or anything else.
Once you’ve simply become aware of your feet and palms, then clench your hands into tight fists and release. Clench. Release. Clench. Release. This allows you to focus on your body, which will put you in the present moment. Expect your mind to wander, and when it does, return your attention to your feet without judging yourself or giving yourself a hard time.

3. Notice the environment

With mindfulness, you don’t have to manipulate your feelings and emotions to stay in the present moment; just simply notice what’s around you. Allow your mind to let go and just notice all the wonderful objects, sites, and sounds around you.
As you’re reading this article, perhaps your hand is touching the mouse, feel this sensation. Notice the objects around you, such as any objects on your table. Expand your awareness to the environment you are in, for instance notice the size of your surroundings, whether it’s a small room or if you can see the enormity of the sky outside.
Notice the colors of your environment. Become aware of any sounds happening around you. Without thinking or mentally commenting on what you notice, just take a moment to become aware of these things.

4. Breathe Deeply

Most meditation techniques revolve around breathing and for good reason: It’s a great way to relax and center yourself.
To begin practising, inhale for 3 seconds and exhale for 3 seconds. As you get more practice, you can increase the amount of seconds, which will make you feel even more centered and relaxed.

5. Listen, don’t just hear

Next time you’re in a conversation, try to notice when you judge the person you’re speaking with. Then once you notice, you can attempt to avoid the judgments and focus on the content of what they’re saying.
Judgments cause us to be bias and not really listen to what others have to say.

6. Watch what you eat

Mindful eating involves paying full attention to the experience of eating and drinking, both inside and outside the body. We pay attention to the colors, smells, textures, flavors, temperatures, and even the sounds (crunch!) of our food. We pay attention to the experience of the body.
Literally feel your body and your senses as you eat. Not only will you enjoy your food more, you’ll begin to realize what food your body thrives on, and what food to avoid.

7. The Mindful Shower

The shower is the perfect time to practice mindfulness. Simply watch the beautiful water hit your skin and embrace the wonder and glory of it all!
Next you have a shower, become aware of how good the warm water feels as it washes over your skin. Be mindful of the smell of the shower gel, and the sensation your hands passing over your skin.

What is the secret to longevity, and why do some people attain it while others don’t? Is it sheer luck, or are there some key factors at play here? Are we all born with the same potential to live a long and healthy life or is that determined solely by genetics?
Interestingly, it seems as though people living in specific regions of the world tend to live longer than those living elsewhere. So, what is it about these specific regions that offer people a chance to live a full life? This was the question that National Geographic explorer Dan Buettner wanted to answer.
Through his research, Buettner identified five geographic locations where people have been observed to live the longest. He has identified these regions as “Blue Zones,” and found that even though these zones differ widely geographically, the diets and lifestyles of their residents share much in common.
You don’t have to live in one of these areas to ensure longevity, however, and if you are looking to live a long and healthy life then you may want to consider the following observations.

What Are the Most Effective Ways to Achieve Longevity?

In Western society, the idea of growing older is not necessarily celebrated or anticipated. It is actually often feared, as we associate old age with chronic pain and disease. But it doesn’t have to be this way, and with some awareness and vision, we too can have a long and purposeful life despite our geographical location.
In the following video, Dan Buettner reveals what he has discovered are the secrets to longevity and the habits and traits shared by those who live the longest. Some of them might shock you, but as Buettner says, “If you ask the average American what the optimal formula for longevity is, they probably couldn’t tell you.” This is a pretty telling statement — many of us are simply unaware of the key lifestyle factors that contribute to health and vitality.
Here are the nine things we can take away from this presentation.

1. Slow Down and Deal With Stress

Common amongst those living in blue zones was effectively dealing with stress when it arises, and in many cases living lifestyles that do not cause a lot of excess stress in the first place. Taking time to slow things down and enjoy life was a common theme throughout Buettner’s studies.

2. Have a Purpose

Having a reason to get out of bed every day, especially for seniors, was essential. Simply put, finding something to do on a regular basis keeps us happy and helps us live longer.

3. Eat Less

Buettner observed the eating habits of various cultures in these regions, and all ate sparingly. The eating habits of the Okinawans specifically demonstrated an aversion to excess. They know that the feeling of fullness comes after the meal is completed so, rather than stuffing themselves until they feel full, they stop eating before they feel full, knowing the feeling will come after. They also eat off small plates and prepare small portions.

4. Eat a Variety of Foods and Lots of Plants

Common among all Blue Zones was the amount and variety of plant-based foods that were being consumed. Having a diet consisting of predominantly plant-based foods proves to be a key factor in longevity regardless of your geographical location.

5. Be Social

In America, elderly people are often put into care homes and lead very lonely and isolated lives. Something all of the Blue Zones have in common is a strong sense of community that includes the older people. Instead of shunned and forgotten, older people are celebrated and included.

6. Have Faith

A large percentage of those living in Blue Zones had faith. They believed in a higher purpose for life, be it religious or spiritual.

7. Drink in Moderation or Not At All

It seems this one was a bit of a toss up. People either enjoyed a glass of wine or two daily or didn’t drink at all. In either case, Buettner did not see people drinking to excess.

8. Move Naturally

People who live in Blue Zones tend to move a lot throughout the day, but they aren’t making a point to do it — it just comes naturally. Their daily activities include gardening, walking, and spending time outdoors.

9. Put Loved Ones First

People in Blue Zones tend to stay close to their family members. Parents and grandparents play a big role in the lives of their children and they stay connected and close by, remaining an integral part of each other’s lives.
Much Love
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